FraudJournal Blog

October 10, 2011

Calling All Detectives…Elder Exploitation Really is a Crime


First, I want it on the record that this posting is about one or two individuals who felt elder exploitation was not a crime, but rather a family matter. Whether or not they thought about their response in detail it still makes one wonder just the same; what are you thinking?

I have been assisting from time to time on a particular elder financial exploitation case, where the children are exploiting their mother. And here is the kicker. We are having trouble getting the detective to accept the case because this is a family matter and law enforcement are about catching and putting the bad guys in jail; not resolving family matters. This individual was sure elder exploitation was a crime to prosecute. The prosecuting attorney who is willing to take the case, can only wait until a detective processes the case and forwards the case for prosecution. And now once again, another elder exploitation case is pending. Pending a detective to accept the case and apply the necessary due diligence to present the case to the prosecuting attorney.

Now in defense of law enforcement, their fraud case backlog is huge. And I really do mean its a big problem. The people needed to process the cases, with the right skill sets, are few and far between. Funding is next to nothing, all cases are prioritized for the level of community threat, and frankly, elder exploitation is not sexy. Unless there appears to be a possible hastened death situation, their priority is child abuse, murder, rape and the war-on-drugs.

Having said this, let me explain some items that you might not know. First, before any case can get to court, it must first receive a case number from the police department that has jurisdiction in the case. This how it gets tracked, noted, filed and if necessary transferred to the proper jurisdictions. No case number, no detective to process, no litigation.  But I digress, the issue is that the detective felt there isn’t  new laws that make it a crime to exploit an elderly person. It was a family matter to be litigated privately. This individual was also surprised to find out that in WA, there recent changes to state law which gives law enforcement and attorneys the ability to better prosecute for elder exploitation and abuse. This means even if there is not, law enforcement are now able to check in on a vulnerable adult and if necessary, take steps to insure their safety from potential harm whether financial or physical.

The recent set of economic setbacks to all local, county and state agencies has greatly reduced the number of qualified staff able to work the high case load. I understand why the fraud case loads are continuing to back up and that they are as frustrated as the rest of us that there is not enough time in a day to process these cases. I and my fellow fraud fighters understand that public servants need to keep the rapists, murderers and drugs off the streets, but I am concerned that I continue to hear from my colleagues this type of response from veteran detectives/law enforcement officers. Really? This is really how you feel?

I am willing to consider that these few individuals were not thinking clearly; that maybe that cup of coffee was not fully loaded with enough caffeine to engage critical thinking. But this response tends to come from older and more experienced law enforcement personnel, and this concerns me. Why? Because they the men and women that the younger professionals are watching and learning from as they strive for excellence to become viable law enforcement professionals.

As the “Boomer” generation continues to age, their level of vulnerability is going to grow exponentially. This means that they are prey for healthcare fraud, ID theft and of course, abuse and exploitation from friends and family.And they are going to need all of our help.

So my challenge to all of you who continue in the fight against fraud and abuse… please help our law enforcement officers & detectives to believe that elder abuse and exploitation is really a crime worth punishing. That the next vulnerable adult they investigate may be the relative of a friend or neighbor; that they just  might save someone from loosing their home and quite possibly their life.

Thank you for listening.

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April 11, 2011

Fighting Fraud By Connecting and Detecting Globally


As the world gets smaller from people traveling more, gaining greater access to information via the internet, movies, television and cellphones, we seem to be sharing at a rate that astounds and thrills the number crunchers. We now share everything from secrets to solutions, inventions to investigations, and things that shouldn’t be mentioned let alone take place. This includes new ways and means to commit fraud including establishing complex webs that challenge the best of us in fraud investigation, as well as ways to counterfeit almost every product manufactured. But as fraud fighters, we are learning how to use that to our advantage. As much as the internet causes us to throw our hands up in the air in frustration we also have shouted loudly with joy when a fraudster unwittingly leaves a trail for us to follow. And we thank them for that.

The best way each of us can reduce the risk of fraud is become educated, connect with each other and work together as transparently as possible. The more we leave the old ways of hoarding our tips and tricks, the stronger we become in unity. By now, most cities, counties and states as well as federal agencies are beginning to understand this and the old network of closed doors is opening up to free-share ideas and solutions. But even better than this is that a new level of young professionals have grabbed onto the possibilities and are both teaching and putting into place ways to be more efficient and effective in the fight against fraud. I applaud all of you who work to share your concerns and network to find solutions. In my effort to continue sharing, I have listed below some sites I have come across recently for you to review and share with each other. I by no means participate in them, or receive any benefit from them. Nor do I present them as the perfect find, but I do find the information to be interesting and provide some ideas to pursue for further consideration and self-education. Keep up the good fight and continue to stay true to your morals and ethics as we all continue to be challenged in life as times become more difficult and trying of faith and patience.

http://blogs.gartner.com/avivah-litan/2010/12/15/2011-threats-and-trends/

http://threatmetrix.com/threatmetrix-announces-fraud-prevention-trends-for-2011/

http://news.hostexploit.com/cybercrime-news/4794-changing-internet-fraud-trends-highlighted-in-ic3-2010-report.html

http://www.publishingtrends.com/2011/04/bloggers-weigh-in-on-the-kindle-swindle-and-new-fraud/

http://www.nlets.org/press/internet-crime-trends-the-latest-report

January 29, 2010

Hello world!

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Welcome to FraudJournal Blog. This is a site in progress, and hopefully you will be informed and begin to make informed decisions to better detect, deter and hopefully not have to defend against fraud.

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